"This is the anatomy of a magazine cover, starting from the top. Literally."

George Lois on the evolution of the modern magazine cover.

Visual media, such as photography and video, are the closest that we can come to experiencing life elsewhere without going there ourselves. When you add a photo to a website, you’re not just adding pretty pixels. You’re offering your users a miniature experience to go along with whatever you’re selling. (via How to use photography in web design | Webdesigner Depot)

Visual media, such as photography and video, are the closest that we can come to experiencing life elsewhere without going there ourselves. When you add a photo to a website, you’re not just adding pretty pixels. You’re offering your users a miniature experience to go along with whatever you’re selling. (via How to use photography in web design | Webdesigner Depot)

fuckyeahmovieposters:

Her by Liam Bushby

Submitted by cinemanu
"Guo Chunning, who designed the “Dancing Beijing” logo for the Beijing 2008 Games, has researched the history of Olympic logos going back to the beginning of the modern Games, in 1896. He believes that, with the exception of Mexico City 1968 and London 2012, this is the first time a logo has lacked drawn elements. (Mexico City and London, however, used lettering that resembled artwork.)"

Behind Sochi’s Futuristic Logo : The New Yorker

Tags: logo

Tags: typography

"At the origin of the phenomenon of scientific knowledge, we find wonder and the contemplation of reality, as we find it created in front of us and not in accordance with the affirmation of our sensibilities or a preconceived image. Therefore, to say that in the mind of the scientist there is something like a childlike spirit is not a rhetorical phrase but indicates a distinctive feature of the attitude required to understand reality: to know how to look, to allow oneself to be amazed by what is there."

How the art of wonder fuels science (via explore-blog)

(Source: , via explore-blog)

(Source: betype, via thedigitalrhetoric)

"The bands are even uniquely colored and monogrammed with your family members’ names so that they won’t get switched up. Why? Because they don’t want their database to get confused and think that you, a 45-year-old man, rode the teacups instead of your little son Timmy. This is one of the first examples I’ve seen of physical design (e.g., monogramming and coloring) for the sake of digital data purity."

You don’t want your privacy: Disney and the meat space data race — Tech News and Analysis

(via Famous movie quotes as simple, witty graphs [13 pictures] | 22 Words)
1. The Drop-Down Menu Drop-down menus have been a cornerstone of user interfaces since the dawn of the Internet. Countless sites continue to use hover state drop-down lists as a critical piece of navigation, but as trends shift toward fully responsive, device-agnostic design, there won’t continue to be simple drop-down menus. In its current form, the drop-down menu cannot function on platforms where the concept of a “hover state” doesn’t exist (on tablets and phones). As the “mobile first” movement continues gaining traction, click-based navigation, such as the use of a “hamburger button” to nest an entire site’s navigation in a clickable list, will become more prevalent. (via Goodbye to 8 Design Elements Whose Time has Come | UX Magazine)

1. The Drop-Down Menu Drop-down menus have been a cornerstone of user interfaces since the dawn of the Internet. Countless sites continue to use hover state drop-down lists as a critical piece of navigation, but as trends shift toward fully responsive, device-agnostic design, there won’t continue to be simple drop-down menus. In its current form, the drop-down menu cannot function on platforms where the concept of a “hover state” doesn’t exist (on tablets and phones). As the “mobile first” movement continues gaining traction, click-based navigation, such as the use of a “hamburger button” to nest an entire site’s navigation in a clickable list, will become more prevalent. (via Goodbye to 8 Design Elements Whose Time has Come | UX Magazine)

Tags: design mobile